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#Repost from @pelotonmagazine (Photo by Kåre Dehlie Thorstad aka @zuperdehlie for @pelotonmagazine) Great photo to capture the moment.

Flashback to the @amgentourofcali, which Sir @bradwiggins won, before winning the British National ITT championship, and before his victory today which made him the world ITT champion. Add those to a top ten result in Paris-Roubaix this season, a Tour de France title, gold medals in track and ITT. For my money, the most complete cyclist of this generation. #wiggo

I love Speedplay pedals, and the new rubber cleat will likely make Keep on Kovers obsolete (I already shared my love for these here), but Speedplay has a screw loose with these optional (read: extra cost) plugs that can be screwed in when you are walking around. 

When I was at the Amgen Tour of CA, I stopped in at the Speedplay tent to tell them how much I like their stuff. They were grateful to hear the love. Then I told them that they needed to buy the Keep on Kovers design and provide them for free with their cleats, for two reasons.

First, no one ever wants to walk anywhere at all with the basic metal cleats. They are horrible on any wood floors or tile and they are super slippery, so you need them covered without a doubt.

At this point the guy interrupts me to tell me that they sell the $10 Coffee Shop Caps, and that this design is better than the Keep on Kovers because it keeps dirt and mud out of the cleat mechanism. 

"Second" I tell him, "is that the Coffee Shop Cap sucks" (which I would have told him already if he hadn’t interrupted me) "because you have to put your foot on the ground to be able to put it on. So you have to keep them in your jersey pocket (space better used for other things), you don’t benefit from them at stop lights or at all until you sit down and clip them over your cleats, and if the hole is covered to keep mud/dirt out then it is too late by the time you put your foot down the first time anyway, right? 

He sat there staring at me blankly. 

So, I support the new cleat design with a rubber face instead of metal, because now the Keep on Kovers are unnecessary but the plug is still so super stupid because logic. 

#tbt to the time that my sons and I met Jens Voigt, the new world hour record holder. Great job, Jens!

Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot. Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!
This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.
The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.
First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.
The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.
Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.
The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.
Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.
Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.
I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot.

Giro Pivot glove: Juuuust right!

This is part 3 of a 3 part series including reviews of the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.

The clear winner for winter gloves in Giro’s lineup is the Pivot, and it wins on almost every front.

First, it uses Primaloft, just like the Proof, but is not nearly as bulky as the Proof, so it feels like a real cycling glove instead of a basic snow glove. In comparison shots above, the Proof is on the left and the Pivot is on the right. The Pivot has no seam on the thumb joint, but instead has a solid piece of leather with the seam further in on the palm. Also, look at the difference in that leather! The Pivot’s leather (100% leather) is similar to the supple glove leather used on the LX, whereas the Proof’s “leather” (55% nylon and 45% polyurethane) is rough and stiff. The Pivot’s leather wraps around the sides of the index finger and thumb, whereas the Proof’s “leather” does not. Pivot has a gel pad on the base of the outer palm edge, Proof does not. Basically, anything that would make a glove cycling-specific is on the Pivot and lacking on the Proof.

The similarities between the two, besides Primaloft, are found in the fabric used for the liner, the fact that neither has a removable liner, and the reflective stripe on the back of the hand.

Of the three gloves I tried from Giro, all three claimed touchscreen compatibility but only the Pivot allowed for phone interaction. It was not 100% accurate, but it was better than the other two options, which never registered even a touch.

The Velcro closure on the pivot is on the inside of the wrist at the cuff, and the Pivot features the same common snot wipe as the Proof.

Basically, the Pivot feels like a cycling long fingered glove with a bit of insulation for cold days, whereas the Proof feels like any old snow glove and the Ambient feels like wearing two pairs of thin gloves that are worn together (uncomfortably) in an effort to find warmth.

Bottom line: until I ride in the very cold of winter, I can’t comment on the warmth of any of the three gloves I tried, but I know that, warmth aside, there is only one pair I would consider keeping: the Giro Pivot.

I am considering trying the new Rapha Winter Glove ($120), but with the Pivot selling for $41.97 (down from $69.99), it is hard to imagine how much better Rapha’s gloves could be for the extra money. I ordered both models of Rapha’s winter gloves last year (the former AW13 versions of the Winter Glove and the Deep Winter Glove), and found that version of the winter glove to be near the same feel of these Pivots, but didn’t feel like they were worth that much money. The Deep Winter glove seemed to be too bulky, and I think were built for wet weather, which I would not be seeing on my rides. I will likely order the current year’s winter glove offerings from Rapha to compare them with what I like about the Pivot.

Giro Ambient Glove
This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.
First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?
The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.
There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.
The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.
The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.
The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.
The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.
The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.
Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”
I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.
I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here.  Giro Ambient Glove
This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.
First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?
The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.
There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.
The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.
The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.
The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.
The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.
The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.
Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”
I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.
I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here.  Giro Ambient Glove
This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.
First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?
The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.
There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.
The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.
The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.
The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.
The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.
The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.
Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”
I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.
I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here.  Giro Ambient Glove
This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.
First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?
The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.
There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.
The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.
The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.
The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.
The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.
The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.
Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”
I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.
I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here.  Giro Ambient Glove
This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.
First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?
The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.
There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.
The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.
The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.
The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.
The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.
The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.
Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”
I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.
I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here.  Giro Ambient Glove
This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.
First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?
The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.
There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.
The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.
The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.
The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.
The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.
The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.
Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”
I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.
I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here. 

Giro Ambient Glove

This is part 2 of a 3 part series of reviews on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.

This is the glove that I want to love, but that failed in almost every way.

First, the concept is awesome. Thin, windproof glove that can keep you warm down to 40f/5c? What’s not to love?

The back of the hand is a stretchy wind stopper fabric. This would seem to be a great glove. I was excited to try it on. That is went things went wrong.

There is a liner in the glove, but the fingertips don’t match up well, so in some fingers the liner was too small and left me with empty fingertips in the outer glove shell, and in some fingers there seemed to be an extra 1/4 inch of liner so the fingers felt stuffed into the outer glove shell. I tried working the liners around because I wanted the gloves to work, but things didn’t improve.

The gloves feature a Velcro strap at the outside of the wrist cuff, and waffle (non removable) liner. Both are shown in photo #3.

The index and thumb on each hand feature silver thread to enable smart phone use, but I could not get a touch from any of the four digits to register on my iPhone. Total bummer, because taking these gloves off to use a phone means having to get them back on and fidgeting with fingertips again. Fat chance.

The gloves have a reflective stripe on the outside edge of the pinky finger, which seems like a weird place for it.

The palms are made of a fabric called AX Suede. I would’ve preferred Pittards leather to this synthetic suede, both for durability and for touch, because the AX suede feels more like a flimsy microfiber fabric.

The snot wipe patch on the back of each thumb is the best that I have seen on any pair of gloves ever. Super soft, appears to be very absorbent, and extends from the tip of the thumb all the way to the wrist.

Although I wanted this glove to be perfect for me, I cannot see it being a pair of gloves that I end up loving. The fit problems, the weird material on the palm, and my doubt that it will actually keep me warm is making this a “no.”

I am hoping to be able to try out the Ambient city gloves. Those feature a full leather outer shell, and are supposed to be really great gloves. I am hoping that they are better thought out and constructed then the Ambient.

I bought the Ambient for $29.99 here

Giro Proof Gloves
This is part 1 of a 3 part series of review on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
The Giro Proof is the warmest of Giro’s offering that is not a lobster claw design. I ordered these after reading that they had a great stand alone liner, but upon delivery I found that this liner is not removable anymore (the description was from a prior model, but showed the current model in the picture). The second picture shows the cuff folded back to reveal the sewn-in liner. Without a removable liner that is a great glove on its own, these are just like any other snow gloves you’d get from any non-cycling specific store (read: bulky and no feeling of touch with the handlebars).
The leather palm does not feel as supple as other Giro offerings (including the Pivot, see part 3), and the snot wipe on the back of the thumb is like many other less expensive offerings (not absorbent, but soft to the touch).
The back of the hand has a reflective stripe that is dark gray when not illuminated, and the gloves can be held together by a mini clasp. the glove was advertized as having compatibility in the two first fingers and thumb on each hand to control a touchscreen like a smartphone, but I could not ever get a touch to register (even with the fingers pulled tight against my fingertip). 
These gloves feature Primaloft insulation, which can be found in items from Patagonia and The North Face, and is known to be very warm with little bulk. Since these gloves still feel bulky, I would assume that they would keep you very warm, so long as you can tolerate the bulkiness. As for me, I have 13 year old Burton snowboarding gloves that remind me of the Proofs and that are still going strong and seem just as fit for cycling as the Proof, so the Proof will not make a spot in my rotation.
I bought the Proof for $47.97 here.
FYI: I ride throughout the winter during the 5-7AM time frame, so last year that meant rides as cold at 24 degrees Fahrenheit. Because I ride in the dark, I usually only ride when the roads are dry or mostly dry. I will be reviewing the gloves based on fit and feel, as I don’t have a way to duplicate very cold weather riding until the cold weather hits. Giro Proof Gloves
This is part 1 of a 3 part series of review on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
The Giro Proof is the warmest of Giro’s offering that is not a lobster claw design. I ordered these after reading that they had a great stand alone liner, but upon delivery I found that this liner is not removable anymore (the description was from a prior model, but showed the current model in the picture). The second picture shows the cuff folded back to reveal the sewn-in liner. Without a removable liner that is a great glove on its own, these are just like any other snow gloves you’d get from any non-cycling specific store (read: bulky and no feeling of touch with the handlebars).
The leather palm does not feel as supple as other Giro offerings (including the Pivot, see part 3), and the snot wipe on the back of the thumb is like many other less expensive offerings (not absorbent, but soft to the touch).
The back of the hand has a reflective stripe that is dark gray when not illuminated, and the gloves can be held together by a mini clasp. the glove was advertized as having compatibility in the two first fingers and thumb on each hand to control a touchscreen like a smartphone, but I could not ever get a touch to register (even with the fingers pulled tight against my fingertip). 
These gloves feature Primaloft insulation, which can be found in items from Patagonia and The North Face, and is known to be very warm with little bulk. Since these gloves still feel bulky, I would assume that they would keep you very warm, so long as you can tolerate the bulkiness. As for me, I have 13 year old Burton snowboarding gloves that remind me of the Proofs and that are still going strong and seem just as fit for cycling as the Proof, so the Proof will not make a spot in my rotation.
I bought the Proof for $47.97 here.
FYI: I ride throughout the winter during the 5-7AM time frame, so last year that meant rides as cold at 24 degrees Fahrenheit. Because I ride in the dark, I usually only ride when the roads are dry or mostly dry. I will be reviewing the gloves based on fit and feel, as I don’t have a way to duplicate very cold weather riding until the cold weather hits. Giro Proof Gloves
This is part 1 of a 3 part series of review on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
The Giro Proof is the warmest of Giro’s offering that is not a lobster claw design. I ordered these after reading that they had a great stand alone liner, but upon delivery I found that this liner is not removable anymore (the description was from a prior model, but showed the current model in the picture). The second picture shows the cuff folded back to reveal the sewn-in liner. Without a removable liner that is a great glove on its own, these are just like any other snow gloves you’d get from any non-cycling specific store (read: bulky and no feeling of touch with the handlebars).
The leather palm does not feel as supple as other Giro offerings (including the Pivot, see part 3), and the snot wipe on the back of the thumb is like many other less expensive offerings (not absorbent, but soft to the touch).
The back of the hand has a reflective stripe that is dark gray when not illuminated, and the gloves can be held together by a mini clasp. the glove was advertized as having compatibility in the two first fingers and thumb on each hand to control a touchscreen like a smartphone, but I could not ever get a touch to register (even with the fingers pulled tight against my fingertip). 
These gloves feature Primaloft insulation, which can be found in items from Patagonia and The North Face, and is known to be very warm with little bulk. Since these gloves still feel bulky, I would assume that they would keep you very warm, so long as you can tolerate the bulkiness. As for me, I have 13 year old Burton snowboarding gloves that remind me of the Proofs and that are still going strong and seem just as fit for cycling as the Proof, so the Proof will not make a spot in my rotation.
I bought the Proof for $47.97 here.
FYI: I ride throughout the winter during the 5-7AM time frame, so last year that meant rides as cold at 24 degrees Fahrenheit. Because I ride in the dark, I usually only ride when the roads are dry or mostly dry. I will be reviewing the gloves based on fit and feel, as I don’t have a way to duplicate very cold weather riding until the cold weather hits. Giro Proof Gloves
This is part 1 of a 3 part series of review on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
The Giro Proof is the warmest of Giro’s offering that is not a lobster claw design. I ordered these after reading that they had a great stand alone liner, but upon delivery I found that this liner is not removable anymore (the description was from a prior model, but showed the current model in the picture). The second picture shows the cuff folded back to reveal the sewn-in liner. Without a removable liner that is a great glove on its own, these are just like any other snow gloves you’d get from any non-cycling specific store (read: bulky and no feeling of touch with the handlebars).
The leather palm does not feel as supple as other Giro offerings (including the Pivot, see part 3), and the snot wipe on the back of the thumb is like many other less expensive offerings (not absorbent, but soft to the touch).
The back of the hand has a reflective stripe that is dark gray when not illuminated, and the gloves can be held together by a mini clasp. the glove was advertized as having compatibility in the two first fingers and thumb on each hand to control a touchscreen like a smartphone, but I could not ever get a touch to register (even with the fingers pulled tight against my fingertip). 
These gloves feature Primaloft insulation, which can be found in items from Patagonia and The North Face, and is known to be very warm with little bulk. Since these gloves still feel bulky, I would assume that they would keep you very warm, so long as you can tolerate the bulkiness. As for me, I have 13 year old Burton snowboarding gloves that remind me of the Proofs and that are still going strong and seem just as fit for cycling as the Proof, so the Proof will not make a spot in my rotation.
I bought the Proof for $47.97 here.
FYI: I ride throughout the winter during the 5-7AM time frame, so last year that meant rides as cold at 24 degrees Fahrenheit. Because I ride in the dark, I usually only ride when the roads are dry or mostly dry. I will be reviewing the gloves based on fit and feel, as I don’t have a way to duplicate very cold weather riding until the cold weather hits. Giro Proof Gloves
This is part 1 of a 3 part series of review on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves. 
The Giro Proof is the warmest of Giro’s offering that is not a lobster claw design. I ordered these after reading that they had a great stand alone liner, but upon delivery I found that this liner is not removable anymore (the description was from a prior model, but showed the current model in the picture). The second picture shows the cuff folded back to reveal the sewn-in liner. Without a removable liner that is a great glove on its own, these are just like any other snow gloves you’d get from any non-cycling specific store (read: bulky and no feeling of touch with the handlebars).
The leather palm does not feel as supple as other Giro offerings (including the Pivot, see part 3), and the snot wipe on the back of the thumb is like many other less expensive offerings (not absorbent, but soft to the touch).
The back of the hand has a reflective stripe that is dark gray when not illuminated, and the gloves can be held together by a mini clasp. the glove was advertized as having compatibility in the two first fingers and thumb on each hand to control a touchscreen like a smartphone, but I could not ever get a touch to register (even with the fingers pulled tight against my fingertip). 
These gloves feature Primaloft insulation, which can be found in items from Patagonia and The North Face, and is known to be very warm with little bulk. Since these gloves still feel bulky, I would assume that they would keep you very warm, so long as you can tolerate the bulkiness. As for me, I have 13 year old Burton snowboarding gloves that remind me of the Proofs and that are still going strong and seem just as fit for cycling as the Proof, so the Proof will not make a spot in my rotation.
I bought the Proof for $47.97 here.
FYI: I ride throughout the winter during the 5-7AM time frame, so last year that meant rides as cold at 24 degrees Fahrenheit. Because I ride in the dark, I usually only ride when the roads are dry or mostly dry. I will be reviewing the gloves based on fit and feel, as I don’t have a way to duplicate very cold weather riding until the cold weather hits.

Giro Proof Gloves

This is part 1 of a 3 part series of review on the Giro Proof, Giro Ambient, and Giro Pivot gloves.

The Giro Proof is the warmest of Giro’s offering that is not a lobster claw design. I ordered these after reading that they had a great stand alone liner, but upon delivery I found that this liner is not removable anymore (the description was from a prior model, but showed the current model in the picture). The second picture shows the cuff folded back to reveal the sewn-in liner. Without a removable liner that is a great glove on its own, these are just like any other snow gloves you’d get from any non-cycling specific store (read: bulky and no feeling of touch with the handlebars).

The leather palm does not feel as supple as other Giro offerings (including the Pivot, see part 3), and the snot wipe on the back of the thumb is like many other less expensive offerings (not absorbent, but soft to the touch).

The back of the hand has a reflective stripe that is dark gray when not illuminated, and the gloves can be held together by a mini clasp. the glove was advertized as having compatibility in the two first fingers and thumb on each hand to control a touchscreen like a smartphone, but I could not ever get a touch to register (even with the fingers pulled tight against my fingertip).

These gloves feature Primaloft insulation, which can be found in items from Patagonia and The North Face, and is known to be very warm with little bulk. Since these gloves still feel bulky, I would assume that they would keep you very warm, so long as you can tolerate the bulkiness. As for me, I have 13 year old Burton snowboarding gloves that remind me of the Proofs and that are still going strong and seem just as fit for cycling as the Proof, so the Proof will not make a spot in my rotation.

I bought the Proof for $47.97 here.

FYI: I ride throughout the winter during the 5-7AM time frame, so last year that meant rides as cold at 24 degrees Fahrenheit. Because I ride in the dark, I usually only ride when the roads are dry or mostly dry. I will be reviewing the gloves based on fit and feel, as I don’t have a way to duplicate very cold weather riding until the cold weather hits.

@jpows new national champ kit is best ever. #repost from @james__fairbank —- Happy Powers

So glad I never bit on the Essentials Case, because no iPhone 6 or 6plus is fitting inside of that thing.

The @teamsky recruits for 2022 and 2025.

The @rodeo_labs trail nuggets are great. At about the same size as a Bonk Breaker bite (2”x2”), they hit the bullseye in size and flavor and texture. I got mine at @thefeedme So far I have only tried the Just Beet It flavor, but I am looking forward to the Lemon Hot Date and Peanut Coco Apocalypse. @velo_steef great job on these.

Labor day labor. #wwytm

Rapha climber's shoe, whiteSimon Mottram in Rapha's climber's shoe, black

I know how awesome Rapha’s new CX shoe is, but I don’t have a CX bike and am not sure if I will ever have a need for them (unless I get a mountain bike, I guess). But the new Climbing Shoes are so great, and I may bite.

The top photo is taken from Logan VonBokel’s piece for VeloNews. He said that the white shoes would have a silver strap, and the black ones would have a high-viz pink strap. 

The white shoes above were my reblog of a nycyclists​ post from January, and they show a black strap. I think they look great, but maybe they were too close to what the GT shoes look like so they swapped them out for silver straps.

The black shoes are shown as worn by Simon Mottram himself at the Tour Down Under and as seen on manualforspeed. They show a black shoe with a silver strap (and a high-viz pink sole!). That was back in January too. This combo (black/silver/pink) looks awesome, but is the only iteration that uses three colors, which may be too busy for Rapha’s taste. A photo recently popped up on Chris Distefano’s instagram account that shows Mr.Mottram changing a flat in black shoes with a pink strap. For some reason, Tumblr is not letting me show that image, so just click through.

What do you think? Of the three colorways, which would you be most likely to buy?